Friday

New Ubuntu Rethinks Desktop Ecosystem

By Jack M. Germain
Apr 26, 2018 9:29 AM PT



Canonical on Thursday released Ubuntu Linux 18.04, which utilizes live patching and a new metric data collection system. Notably missing is the Unity desktop that had distinguished the distro but was poorly received.


New Ubuntu Rethinks Desktop Ecosystem


Canonical last year made the switch from Unity 7 to upstream GNOME as Ubuntu’s default desktop environment. Unity is not an option in Ubuntu 18.04 and will not be available in desktop offerings moving forward.


“The overall response was positive,” said Will Cooke, engineering director for desktop at Canonical. The development team tweaked the GNOME shell just enough to give it a face that clearly identifies it as part of Ubuntu.


The main reason for dropping Unity was lack of uptake. The team decided to stop investing in its homegrown desktop environment and return to Ubuntu’s roots with upstream GNOME, Cooke noted.



Progress Path


The development team used Ubuntu version 17.10 as its proving ground for transitioning from Unity 7 to the GNOME shell. Primarily, that was for its long-term support.


That transition proved that users would have a seamless upgrade path, Cooke said. The five-year support also set the groundwork for developers to build for a common platform, as the same Ubuntu version runs in the cloud and on all devices.


“This is the main reason we continue to see uptake on Ubuntu from developers,” he remarked. Ubuntu offers “reliability and a proven background of uptake and security, and other critical packages.”



What to Expect


Live patching is an important new feature in Ubuntu 18.04. It allows the installation of updates on a running machine without requiring a reboot, enabling the immediate application of security updates.


Another big thing, particularly for the Ubuntu team, is a new system for acquiring data on metrics. Ubuntu essentially will phone home to report hardware details and user installation options.


The metric information-gathering includes anonymized details on the age of the machine, how much RAM it has, and whether the user installed it from a DVD or USB stick, or upgraded in place.


No identifiable user information will be uploaded, but users can opt out of the sharing part if they wish, said Cooke.


The goal is to find out details about preferences and hardware to help the development team better address a particular market, he said.


“Until now, we simply have not had the ability to gather that information,” Cooke continued. “It will focus our energies for future releases. We also intend to make those details available to other projects. For instance, if we discover that a majority of users have older hardware, we must tailor our development to those machine capabilities.”



Minimal for Enterprise


Ubuntu 18.04 includes a new feature that addresses a growing enterprise concern: home user clutter. IT managers in workplace environments easily can strip out software that does not pertain to the work environment, such as games.


“They do not really want them, and they do not really need them,” said Cooke, noting that this minimal install capability meets requests from IT managers.


It cost enterprises money to have someone go through each installation and remove those items or create automation to do those removals for them, but Ubuntu 18.04 now does that for them.


The minimum install option goes through the process of stripping out home-user-centric applications.


“It is significant and a needed convenience,” Cooke said.



Craft Snaps Take Over


Ubuntu 18.04 relies on Snapcraft to feed software applications to the operating system. It ships with Snaps by default.


Snaps speed up software delivery and make the process more secure, according to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager for Snapcraft at Canonical.


Snapcraft, developed by Canonical, lets software vendors distribute to all of Ubuntu and a growing list of distributions platforms with a single artifact. It replaces different packaging systems like .deb and .rpm.


“Snaps let vendors publish a software update at their own pace. Vendors are not locked into a release cycle of Ubuntu or any other distribution. The updates themselves apply automatically and can roll back if anything goes wrong,” Dandrea said.



Expanding the Process


For many applications in use today, it takes a long time to get updates vetted through a distro’s community software repository. The process involves installing, modifying and reinstalling.


In 18.04, for the first time, Ubuntu delivers important applications by default in a Snap. Thousands more applications are integrated into the app store, so users no longer have to search around for the latest versions of their software, according to Dandrea.


“The goal is to give everyone access to the latest software without a lot of frustration,” he said.


With Snaps, each update is tamper-proof. The applications are locked down, much like they are in Docker, but Snap is much more lightweight, Dandrea said.



Growing the Platform


Ubuntu’s focus on delivering software via Snapcraft offers several benefits, noted Dandrea. One is that enterprise users do not face a risk of downtime. Another is that home users can register up to three machines on their UbuntuOne account.


All users will find the service more streamlined and simpler to use. In general, users can expect Ubuntu 18.04 to be fast and light as well as reliable, stable and secure, according to Dandrea.


The Snapcraft ecosystem is gaining momentum. Major software outlets, such as Spotify and Google, have adopted the Snap platform. Developer sign-up has tripled in the last three months alone, he said.


Developer tools are now available for Snap construction. Snaps are no longer just about Ubuntu. It has become a team effort.


“We are seeing cross-distribution success. For instance, if you are running any distribution besides Ubuntu, you no longer have to wait for local repositories to repackage the latest releases,” said Dandrea.



Dev Advantages


Developers can reach the largest population of Linux users of all distributions with one release. Self-contained libraries are included in the Snap package.


That means software developers no longer have to debug their way through every conceivable combination. If an application needs a dependency, it is bundled with the Snap, noted Dandrea.


“The bottom line is Snaps are lowering the barrier of entry in developing for Linux or publishing software for Linux,” he said. “They require no additional infrastructure.”



Bonus Feature


One new feature in the latest Ubuntu release appeals to software developers in particular: the ability to run Ubuntu on a Windows computer in a virtual machine. This gives developers a seamless experience moving between Linux and Windows on a single machine, with the ability to copy and paste between them.


“This ability was a huge demand from the developer community,” said Cooke. “This is another obstacle removed from their path to really allow them to benefit from the power of Ubuntu from their Windows machine.”



Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open source technologies. He has written numerous reviews of Linux distros and other open source software.

Email Jack.


Facebook, Google face first GDPR complaints over “forced consent”

After two years coming down the pipe at tech giants, Europe’s new privacy framework, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), is now being applied — and long time Facebook privacy critic, Max Schrems, has wasted no time in filing four complaints relating to (certain) companies’ ‘take it or leave it’ stance when it comes to consent.

The complaints have been filed on behalf of (unnamed) individual users — with one filed against Facebook; one against Facebook-owned Instagram; one against Facebook-owned WhatsApp; and one against Google’s Android.

Schrems argues that the companies are using a strategy of “forced consent” to continue processing the individuals’ personal data — when in fact the law requires that users be given a free choice unless a consent is strictly necessary for provision of the service. (And, well, Facebook claims its core product is social networking — rather than farming people’s personal data for ad targeting.)

“It’s simple: Anything strictly necessary for a service does not need consent boxes anymore. For everything else users must have a real choice to say ‘yes’ or ‘no’,” Schrems writes in a statement.

“Facebook has even blocked accounts of users who have not given consent,” he adds. “In the end users only had the choice to delete the account or hit the “agree”-button — that’s not a free choice, it more reminds of a North Korean election process.”

We’ve reached out to all the companies involved for comment and will update this story with any response. Update: Facebook has now sent the following statement, attributed to its chief privacy officer, Erin Egan: “We have prepared for the past 18 months to ensure we meet the requirements of the GDPR. We have made our policies clearer, our privacy settings easier to find and introduced better tools for people to access, download, and delete their information. Our work to improve people’s privacy doesn’t stop on May 25th. For example, we’re building Clear History: a way for everyone to see the websites and apps that send us information when you use them, clear this information from your account, and turn off our ability to store it associated with your account going forward.”

Schrems most recently founded a not-for-profit digital rights organization to focus on strategic litigation around the bloc’s updated privacy framework, and the complaints have been filed via this crowdfunded NGO — which is called noyb (aka ‘none of your business’).

As we pointed out in our GDPR explainer, the provision in the regulation allowing for collective enforcement of individuals’ data rights in an important one, with the potential to strengthen the implementation of the law by enabling non-profit organizations such as noyb to file complaints on behalf of individuals — thereby helping to redress the imbalance between corporate giants and consumer rights.

That said, the GDPR’s collective redress provision is a component that Member States can choose to derogate from, which helps explain why the first four complaints have been filed with data protection agencies in Austria, Belgium, France and Hamburg in Germany — regions that also have data protection agencies with a strong record defending privacy rights.

Given that the Facebook companies involved in these complaints have their European headquarters in Ireland it’s likely the Irish data protection agency will get involved too. And it’s fair to say that, within Europe, Ireland does not have a strong reputation for defending data protection rights.

But the GDPR allows for DPAs in different jurisdictions to work together in instances where they have joint concerns and where a service crosses borders — so noyb’s action looks intended to test this element of the new framework too.

Under the penalty structure of GDPR, major violations of the law can attract fines as large as 4% of a company’s global revenue which, in the case of Facebook or Google, implies they could be on the hook for more than a billion euros apiece — if they are deemed to have violated the law, as the complaints argue.

That said, given how freshly fixed in place the rules are, some EU regulators may well tread softly on the enforcement front — at least in the first instances, to give companies some benefit of the doubt and/or a chance to make amends to come into compliance if they are deemed to be falling short of the new standards.

However, in instances where companies themselves appear to be attempting to deform the law with a willfully self-serving interpretation of the rules, regulators may feel they need to act swiftly to nip any disingenuousness in the bud.

“We probably will not immediately have billions of penalty payments, but the corporations have intentionally violated the GDPR, so we expect a corresponding penalty under GDPR,” writes Schrems.

Only yesterday, for example, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg — speaking in an on stage interview at the VivaTech conference in Paris — claimed his company hasn’t had to make any radical changes to comply with GDPR, and further claimed that a “vast majority” of Facebook users are willingly opting in to targeted advertising via its new consent flow.

“We’ve been rolling out the GDPR flows for a number of weeks now in order to make sure that we were doing this in a good way and that we could take into account everyone’s feedback before the May 25 deadline. And one of the things that I’ve found interesting is that the vast majority of people choose to opt in to make it so that we can use the data from other apps and websites that they’re using to make ads better. Because the reality is if you’re willing to see ads in a service you want them to be relevant and good ads,” said Zuckerberg.

He did not mention that the dominant social network does not offer people a free choice on accepting or declining targeted advertising. The new consent flow Facebook revealed ahead of GDPR only offers the ‘choice’ of quitting Facebook entirely if a person does not want to accept targeting advertising. Which, well, isn’t much of a choice given how powerful the network is. (Additionally, it’s worth pointing out that Facebook continues tracking non-users — so even deleting a Facebook account does not guarantee that Facebook will stop processing your personal data.)

Asked about how Facebook’s business model will be affected by the new rules, Zuckerberg essentially claimed nothing significant will change — “because giving people control of how their data is used has been a core principle of Facebook since the beginning”.

“The GDPR adds some new controls and then there’s some areas that we need to comply with but overall it isn’t such a massive departure from how we’ve approached this in the past,” he claimed. “I mean I don’t want to downplay it — there are strong new rules that we’ve needed to put a bunch of work into into making sure that we complied with — but as a whole the philosophy behind this is not completely different from how we’ve approached things.

“In order to be able to give people the tools to connect in all the ways they want and build committee a lot of philosophy that is encoded in a regulation like GDPR is really how we’ve thought about all this stuff for a long time. So I don’t want to understate the areas where there are new rules that we’ve had to go and implement but I also don’t want to make it seem like this is a massive departure in how we’ve thought about this stuff.”

Zuckerberg faced a range of tough questions on these points from the EU parliament earlier this week. But he avoided answering them in any meaningful detail.

So EU regulators are essentially facing a first test of their mettle — i.e. whether they are willing to step up and defend the line of the law against big tech’s attempts to reshape it in their business model’s image.

Privacy laws are nothing new in Europe but robust enforcement of them would certainly be a breath of fresh air. And now at least, thanks to GDPR, there’s a penalties structure in place to provide incentives as well as teeth, and spin up a market around strategic litigation — with Schrems and noyb in the vanguard.

Schrems also makes the point that small startups and local companies are less likely to be able to use the kind of strong-arm ‘take it or leave it’ tactics on users that big tech is able to use to extract consent on account of the reach and power of their platforms — arguing there’s a competition concern that GDPR should also help to redress.

“The fight against forced consent ensures that the corporations cannot force users to consent,” he writes. “This is especially important so that monopolies have no advantage over small businesses.”

Image credit: noyb.eu

The Scaling Challenge

There is a meme making the rounds and I have no idea how old it is or its origins but I’ve heard it twice in the last week. It’s easier to start a company than it is to scale one. You can’t say it’s a revolutionary thought, but for the last 20 years the emphasis has been decidedly on founding, so this is something of a departure.


The Scaling Challenge


Startups don’t grow to the moon on average. For instance, if we didn’t have Salesforce, would we even remember the dot-com boom at the start of the century? There have been so many startups; some failed and many were bought, and their names disappeared. So we have a lot of experience and data about what to do — and equally important, what to avoid — in starting a company.



No User Guide



A case in point: Venture capitalists commonly look for a business model and a minimally viable product (MVP) in the early rounds, and they want to see a repeatable revenue model later as they attempt to bring a company to the market. Not having either, or even not having one, is death. That’s a far cry from the era when business proposals were written on cocktail napkins.


There are no precise formulas for how to scale a company, once the MVP is not so minimal and the revenue model is fairly predictable. We may have lots of memory about this phase but it’s nothing like early days.


At the same time, once a business has reached the relatively calm waters of early adulthood, you can bet the marketplace has changed enough to cause some rethinking. The impulse to do everything at once is just as prevalent for early adult companies as it is for those more junior, but it is also more perilous. Failing as a startup happens all the time, but failing after initial success can be very painful since so much is riding on continued success.


It was refreshing, therefore, to see how NetSuite was coping with success when I attended the analyst events at SuiteWorld ’18 in Las Vegas. In its still young life, NetSuite has been a startup, an IPO candidate, and an acquisition target.



Staying the Course



Now part of Oracle, NetSuite has a lot of growing left to do, but it is still able to take the measure of where it’s been. Executive Vice President Jim McGeever and founder and EVP of Development Evan Goldberg were able to provide a convincing and down-to-earth morning presentation of NetSuite’s approach to the market.


“We’re not going to boil the ocean,” Goldberg said several times, emphasizing the company’s commitment to stay on track. The goal is to deliver functionality for NetSuite customers while avoiding the pitfalls of more full-blown development projects that might scratch a research itch but not necessarily deliver utility to customers.


Part of the credit for this approach likely should go to Oracle. Since buying NetSuite, it has provided cash to expand operations — for example going from 60 to 600 sales people in EME — while exercising a light touch on operations. It also has contributed sound management.


Perhaps one reason for NetSuite’s success was the continued involvement of Larry Ellison as a board member and part owner during the company’s formative years. With Ellison’s influence, it’s hard to see how NetSuite could have failed to become a good acquisition candidate.



Focus on Micro-Verticals


As for scaling a middle-sized company, NetSuite demonstrated its focus on its customers in its announcements and interviews with customer CEOs. One good example of its focus has been its SuiteSuccess program, designed to take the pain and risk out of the onboarding process, especially for smaller customers.


Another good example is NetSuite’s focus on micro-verticals, markets where it intends to deliver 80 percent of the necessary back office functionality out of the box, in order to speed up onboarding and adoption.


There are 33 micro-verticals for 14 industries, and there’s a need for scores more, according to McGeever. There’s no doubt about that, but it might have been equally useful to say more about the tools and technologies that provide the last 20 percent. There’s no doubt the technology is available, so the messaging should track it a bit closer.


That said, NetSuite appears to be benefiting from the acquisition by accessing Oracle’s resources — including its cash and brain power — to scale at a time when it can be put to work to good effect.


My last point, which is something the financial analysts may not have calculated: The new Oracle data centers going up around the world will be perfect homes for products like NetSuite, which is growing significantly outside of North America (more than 80 percent recently). The company has plans to prove this when the German data center becomes operational.


It looks as though it won’t be too difficult to populate those facilities, and this will give Oracle’s continuing cloud rollout added momentum.


The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ECT News Network.



Denis Pombriant is a well-known CRM industry analyst, strategist, writer and speaker. His new book, You Can’t Buy Customer Loyalty, But You Can Earn It, is now available on Amazon. His 2015 book, Solve for the Customer, is also available there.

Email Denis.

Facebook, Google face first GDPR complaints over “forced consent”

After two years coming down the pipe at tech giants, Europe’s new privacy framework, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), is now being applied — and long time Facebook privacy critic, Max Schrems, has wasted no time in filing four complaints relating to (certain) companies’ ‘take it or leave it’ stance when it comes to consent.

The complaints have been filed on behalf of (unnamed) individual users — with one filed against Facebook; one against Facebook-owned Instagram; one against Facebook-owned WhatsApp; and one against Google’s Android.

Schrems argues that the companies are using a strategy of “forced consent” to continue processing the individuals’ personal data — when in fact the law requires that users be given a free choice unless a consent is strictly necessary for provision of the service. (And, well, Facebook claims its core product is social networking — rather than farming people’s personal data for ad targeting.)

“It’s simple: Anything strictly necessary for a service does not need consent boxes anymore. For everything else users must have a real choice to say ‘yes’ or ‘no’,” Schrems writes in a statement.

“Facebook has even blocked accounts of users who have not given consent,” he adds. “In the end users only had the choice to delete the account or hit the “agree”-button — that’s not a free choice, it more reminds of a North Korean election process.”

We’ve reached out to all the companies involved for comment and will update this story with any response. Update: Facebook has now sent the following statement, attributed to its chief privacy officer, Erin Egan: “We have prepared for the past 18 months to ensure we meet the requirements of the GDPR. We have made our policies clearer, our privacy settings easier to find and introduced better tools for people to access, download, and delete their information. Our work to improve people’s privacy doesn’t stop on May 25th. For example, we’re building Clear History: a way for everyone to see the websites and apps that send us information when you use them, clear this information from your account, and turn off our ability to store it associated with your account going forward.”

Schrems most recently founded a not-for-profit digital rights organization to focus on strategic litigation around the bloc’s updated privacy framework, and the complaints have been filed via this crowdfunded NGO — which is called noyb (aka ‘none of your business’).

As we pointed out in our GDPR explainer, the provision in the regulation allowing for collective enforcement of individuals’ data rights in an important one, with the potential to strengthen the implementation of the law by enabling non-profit organizations such as noyb to file complaints on behalf of individuals — thereby helping to redress the imbalance between corporate giants and consumer rights.

That said, the GDPR’s collective redress provision is a component that Member States can choose to derogate from, which helps explain why the first four complaints have been filed with data protection agencies in Austria, Belgium, France and Hamburg in Germany — regions that also have data protection agencies with a strong record defending privacy rights.

Given that the Facebook companies involved in these complaints have their European headquarters in Ireland it’s likely the Irish data protection agency will get involved too. And it’s fair to say that, within Europe, Ireland does not have a strong reputation for defending data protection rights.

But the GDPR allows for DPAs in different jurisdictions to work together in instances where they have joint concerns and where a service crosses borders — so noyb’s action looks intended to test this element of the new framework too.

Under the penalty structure of GDPR, major violations of the law can attract fines as large as 4% of a company’s global revenue which, in the case of Facebook or Google, implies they could be on the hook for more than a billion euros apiece — if they are deemed to have violated the law, as the complaints argue.

That said, given how freshly fixed in place the rules are, some EU regulators may well tread softly on the enforcement front — at least in the first instances, to give companies some benefit of the doubt and/or a chance to make amends to come into compliance if they are deemed to be falling short of the new standards.

However, in instances where companies themselves appear to be attempting to deform the law with a willfully self-serving interpretation of the rules, regulators may feel they need to act swiftly to nip any disingenuousness in the bud.

“We probably will not immediately have billions of penalty payments, but the corporations have intentionally violated the GDPR, so we expect a corresponding penalty under GDPR,” writes Schrems.

Only yesterday, for example, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg — speaking in an on stage interview at the VivaTech conference in Paris — claimed his company hasn’t had to make any radical changes to comply with GDPR, and further claimed that a “vast majority” of Facebook users are willingly opting in to targeted advertising via its new consent flow.

“We’ve been rolling out the GDPR flows for a number of weeks now in order to make sure that we were doing this in a good way and that we could take into account everyone’s feedback before the May 25 deadline. And one of the things that I’ve found interesting is that the vast majority of people choose to opt in to make it so that we can use the data from other apps and websites that they’re using to make ads better. Because the reality is if you’re willing to see ads in a service you want them to be relevant and good ads,” said Zuckerberg.

He did not mention that the dominant social network does not offer people a free choice on accepting or declining targeted advertising. The new consent flow Facebook revealed ahead of GDPR only offers the ‘choice’ of quitting Facebook entirely if a person does not want to accept targeting advertising. Which, well, isn’t much of a choice given how powerful the network is. (Additionally, it’s worth pointing out that Facebook continues tracking non-users — so even deleting a Facebook account does not guarantee that Facebook will stop processing your personal data.)

Asked about how Facebook’s business model will be affected by the new rules, Zuckerberg essentially claimed nothing significant will change — “because giving people control of how their data is used has been a core principle of Facebook since the beginning”.

“The GDPR adds some new controls and then there’s some areas that we need to comply with but overall it isn’t such a massive departure from how we’ve approached this in the past,” he claimed. “I mean I don’t want to downplay it — there are strong new rules that we’ve needed to put a bunch of work into into making sure that we complied with — but as a whole the philosophy behind this is not completely different from how we’ve approached things.

“In order to be able to give people the tools to connect in all the ways they want and build committee a lot of philosophy that is encoded in a regulation like GDPR is really how we’ve thought about all this stuff for a long time. So I don’t want to understate the areas where there are new rules that we’ve had to go and implement but I also don’t want to make it seem like this is a massive departure in how we’ve thought about this stuff.”

Zuckerberg faced a range of tough questions on these points from the EU parliament earlier this week. But he avoided answering them in any meaningful detail.

So EU regulators are essentially facing a first test of their mettle — i.e. whether they are willing to step up and defend the line of the law against big tech’s attempts to reshape it in their business model’s image.

Privacy laws are nothing new in Europe but robust enforcement of them would certainly be a breath of fresh air. And now at least, thanks to GDPR, there’s a penalties structure in place to provide incentives as well as teeth, and spin up a market around strategic litigation — with Schrems and noyb in the vanguard.

Schrems also makes the point that small startups and local companies are less likely to be able to use the kind of strong-arm ‘take it or leave it’ tactics on users that big tech is able to use to extract consent on account of the reach and power of their platforms — arguing there’s a competition concern that GDPR should also help to redress.

“The fight against forced consent ensures that the corporations cannot force users to consent,” he writes. “This is especially important so that monopolies have no advantage over small businesses.”

Image credit: noyb.eu

Ajay Devgn’s reaction to Kajol’s wax statue at Madame Tussauds is hilarious!

Bollywood actress Kajol’s wax statue unveils at Madame Tussauds in Singapore. The actress flew down to unveil the statue with her daughter Nysa.



This was the first time when her daughter accompanied her on the red-carpet. Unfortunately, Ajay Devgn wasn’t there with his wife in Singapore.


Kajol shared the selfie with her wax statue on her Instagram and she captioned it as “Always been a Kajol fan 😉😉😜”.



However, Ajay’s reaction to wife Kajol’s wax statue is hilarious.


Ajay shared a video of Nysa posing with both the Kajols with the caption, “Meet the silent Kajol 😉.”



In the video, we can see Kajol in a monochrome saree, posing beside her daughter, Nysa and her wax statue. Suddenly, Nysa says statue and walks out of the frame, leaving mother Kajol zipped.


Kajol is known for her performance in movies like “Karan Arjun”, “Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge”, “Gupt: The Hidden Truth”, “Ishq”, “Pyaar Kiya To Darna Kya”, “Kuch Kuch Hota Hai”, “Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham…”, “Kal Ho Naa Ho” and “My Name is Khan”


On the work front, Kajol is busy with the shoot of Eela, which is being directed by Pradeep Sarkar. Eela is slated to release on September 14, 2018.

Artist Makes Art From Discarded Cosmetics



A British university student has created a range of watercolor paints made from discarded cosmetics. An example, she says, of how the so-called ‘circular economy’ can help improve the environment. It could also be a way for cosmetics companies and retailers to reduce waste and make more money. VOA’s Julie Taboh has more.


Har Shaakh Pe Ullu Baithaa Hai Face Rajeev Nigam’s Son Is In ICU, Praying To Get Him Well Soon


Get Daily Updates In Email



Har Shaakh Pe Ullu Baithaa Hai Face Rajeev Nigam’s Son Is In ICU, Praying To Get Him Well Soon

Popular stand-up comedian and actor Rajeev Nigam, who has worked in various comedy shows and become a household name after his new show named as Har Shaakh Pe Ullu Baithaa Hai is going through the very difficult time of his life.


Today, Rajeev Nigam is not in a state of laughter. He is going through the hard time. Actually, Rajeev recently shared a photo of his younger son on the Facebook account and wrote the caption by informing us about the critical condition of his son that he is on the ventilator from past thirteen days.


Check out the post shared by Rajeev Nigam here:




Mera beta kal se bahut critical hai ..ventilator pe hai..aap sab log uske liye pray karein….ki wo jaldi swasth ho jaaye…


Gepostet von Rajeev Nigam am Donnerstag, 10. Mai 2018




His post read as, “Mera beta kal se bahut critical hai ..ventilator pe hai..aap sab log uske liye pray karein….ki wo jaldi swasth ho jaaye…”


He also on May 21st shared a picture of his son with caption, “Aaj 13 din ho gaye hai mere bete devraj ko abhi bhi hosh nahi aaya hai icu mein hai aap sabki duwao aur prayers ki zaroorat hai..bhagwan usko jaldi swasth karein.”




Aaj 13 din ho gaye hai mere bete devraj ko abhi bhi hosh nahi aaya hai icu mein hai aap sabki duwao aur prayers ki zaroorat hai..bhagwan usko jaldi swasth karein


Gepostet von Rajeev Nigam am Montag, 21. Mai 2018




Well, we still don’t know why his son is in ICU, as Nigam has given no information in his post that his son Devraj is admitted in the ICU due to which. At the same time, the fans of Rajiv Nigam are praying that his younger son Devraj will recover soon.



Image Source


However, on the professional front, Rajeev was last seen in the political satire show named as Har Shaakh Pe Ullu Baithaa Hai. The shown was broadcast on Star Plus.


Well, we are also praying that his son will get well soon.


Stay connected to Laughing Colours for more such updates.


Published by Kajal Thakur on 24 May 2018